Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most serious cancers, because it is often found late.
If you have pancreatic cancer, you want the care that will give you the best chance for recovery. Fortunately, you’ll find it right here close to home. 

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most serious cancers, because it is often found late. If you have pancreatic cancer, you want the care that will give you the best chance for recovery. Fortunately, you’ll find it right here close to home.

At the Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute, you’ll find doctors who are leaders in their fields. You’ll have the advantages of the latest advances in technology. And you’ll benefit from our active involvement in research to find new treatments that extend life.

Who is at risk for pancreatic cancer?

Pancreatic cancer occurs more frequently in men than women. Age is also a factor; many pancreatic cancer patients are between the ages of 65 and 80.

Three to four percent of pancreatic cancers are due to inherited gene alteration, like BRCA 1 and BRCA2 genes. These genes can increase the risk for breast, ovary, prostate and bladder cancers. Diets high in fat and processed meat, obesity, a history of diabetes, and exposure to industrial carcinogens also may increase your risk.

Treatment options for pancreatic cancer

There are more treatment options available today than ever before if you are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer

  • Expanded chemotherapy treatments

Within the last two decades, chemotherapy treatment options have expanded from one single drug to a menu of options that offer patients more life, more care, more hope.

  • Multidisciplinary clinic (MDC) at Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute

Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute offers cancer patients private consultation meetings with cancer specialists through multidisciplinary clinics (MDC). For pancreatic cancer patients, the gastrointestinal cancer MDC brings together specialists from surgical oncology, radiation oncology, medical oncology, nursing, radiology, pathology clinical trials, nutrition and social services. This collaborative, interdisciplinary group explains the patient’s diagnosis and offers recommendations for treatment. As part of the MDC meeting, the patient and his or her loved ones are encouraged to ask questions. A nurse navigator also attends the MDC and coordinates care for the patient afterward.

  • Access to clinical trials

There is so much new pancreatic cancer research happening at this very moment including new chemotherapy drugs, targeted therapies, immunotherapy, and drug combinations. Patients at the Cancer Institute can participate in clinical trials through NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), as well as clinical trials available at Memorial Sloan Kettering through the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Alliance. We also have many other pharmacology and investigator initiated trials, as well.

At the Cancer Institute, you will receive superior medical care and practical help for you and your family during treatment and recovery. You will be treated with respect, kindness and compassion.