Dual-Enrollment Program with Alvernia University Courses

First Year Courses

BIO 107 Human Anatomy and Physiology I – 3 credits (42 hours)
The purpose of this three credit course is to present an overview of normal human anatomy and physiology. The human body will be studied from both a microscopic and a macroscopic view. Anatomical structures will be correlated with the functions (physiology) of cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. During the first semester of this two semester course, the areas to be studied include cells and histology as well as the integumentary, skeletal, muscle and nervous systems. The course includes three one-hour lectures each week and is accompanied by a two-hour lab, BIO 117, Anatomy and Physiology I Lab. Co-requisite: BIO 117

BIO 117 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory – 1 credit (30 hours)
Experimental approach to the study of human anatomy and physiology is used to reinforce lecture concepts. The exercises present the core elements of the subject matter in a hands-on manner. The labs are presented in the same time period the material is being discussed in lecture. One 2 hour lab per week. Co-requisite: BIO 107

COM 101 Composition and Research – 3 credits (42 hours)
This course is an introduction to the critical thinking, reading, researching, and writing skills that a student will encounter in an academic setting. Students will learn to develop their own ideas and respond to the ideas of others. Students will begin by writing a personal essay, which will prepare them to transition into a variety of academic modes: rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, argumentation, and research. Students will learn both APA and MLA citation styles. Students must achieve "C" or better to fulfill core requirements

PSY 101 – Introductory Psychology – 3 credits (42 hours)
This course is an introduction to major concepts and findings in psychology with emphasis on basic processes underlying human behaviors.

BIO 108 Human Anatomy and Physiology II – 3 credits (42 hours)
The purpose of this three credit course is to present an overview of human physiology and anatomy and is a continuation of the material studied in Anatomy and Physiology I. The human body is studied on both microscopic and macroscopic levels and anatomical structures are correlated with the functions (physiology) of organs and organ systems. The systems to be examined include the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. The course includes 3 (one hour) lectures per week. Prerequisite: BIO 107/117 Co-requisite: Human Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory (Bio 118)

BIO 118 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory – 1 credit (30 hours)
Experimental approach to the study of human anatomy and physiology is used to reinforce lecture concepts. The exercises present the core elements of the subject matter in a hands-on manner. The labs are presented in the same time period the material is being discussed in lecture. One 2 hour lab per week. Prerequisite: BIO 117 Co-requisite: Bio 108

COM 103 Fundamentals of Speech – 3 credits (42 hours)
This is a basic course in the development of communication attitudes and skills with a view to enable the student to feel comfortable and competent in public speaking ventures. The course includes exercises in the oral interpretation of literature; the organization, deliver, and evaluation of various types of speeches and participation in panels or symposiums.

BIO 220 – Clinical Microbiology – 4 credits (42 hours lecture and 45 hours laboratory)
Lecture section - Microbiology provides an overview of the diversity of microorganisms and their relationships to human welfare and diseases. This course is a balance between the microbiological fundamentals and applications, and between medical application and other applied areas of microbiology, for the health science major. Labs emphasize bacteriological techniques, culturing, staining and aseptic techniques, and identification of various bacteria using selective/differential medias.

Laboratory section - Study of the morphological and physiological nature of microorganisms and their relationship to humans in both the normal and the disease states. Emphasis on bacteriological techniques such as cultivation, staining, identification, and other techniques important in a clinical setting. Integrates laboratory and classroom work.

MUS 220 Music and Health – 3 credits (42 hours)
Basic music course in the theories and techniques of music as an agent of wellness. Explores music therapy, recent research, and healing practices of non-Western cultures as they relate to music. Especially recommended for students planning a career in healthcare or human services. No prerequisites, no prior musical experience or performance required.

MAT 109 Principles of Nursing Math for Safe Client Care – 1 credit (14 hours)
This course focuses on basic mathematical calculations as applied to clinical nursing practice, in particular, accurate medication dosage calculation. Nursing math skills are developed and practiced through application exercises involving clients across the lifespan. Critical thinking skills are developed through the interpretation of medication orders. Professional standards related to quality and safety of medication administration are integrated throughout the course. 

PHI 105 Introduction to Philosophy – 3 credits (42 hours)
Historical introduction to fundamental problems and methods of philosophy based on readings in ancient medieval and modern literature.

Second Year Courses

NURS 100: Principles of Nursing – 9 credits Theory 90 hours; Clinical 135 hours
Nursing 100 is a fundamental nursing course that introduces the student to the profession of nursing. Basic nursing concepts are presented with emphasis on the Nursing Process. Essential nursing and communication skills are developed to meet patient needs in a medical-surgical setting. Opportunities for implementation of these skills are provided in concurrent simulation and clinical experiences. The course incorporates American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice, Quality and Safety Education for Nursing Competencies, and The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220; MAT 109

NURS 101: Medical-Surgical/Psychosocial Nursing I – 8 credits Theory 75 hours; Clinical 135 hours
Medical-Surgical Nursing/Psychosocial Nursing I is built on the knowledge and basic nursing skills taught during the previous term. This course provides the student with various learning experiences in utilizing the nursing process to provide safe, evidenced-based nursing care and to meet the needs of the patients, family, and the community. The topics taught in this course are respiratory, cardiovascular, hematologic, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and psychosocial disorders. The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals, the Quality and Safety Education for Nurse Competencies, and the American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice are integrated throughout the course. Students receive concurrent simulation and clinical experiences. Observational experiences are provided in the hospital and in the community settings. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220 MAT 109; NURS 100 Corequisite: BIO 410

BIO 410 – Pathophysiology – 3 credits (42 hours)
BIO 410 is a 3-credit course dealing with alterations in normal physiology as a result of the disease process and its effect on different organ systems. This course builds on principles of normal anatomy, physiology and chemistry. Nursing implications will also be examined through case study presentations. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220 MAT 109; NURS 100; Co-requisite: Nursing 101

NURS 102: Medical-Surgical/Psychosocial Nursing II – 8 credits – Theory 75 hours; Clinical 135 hours
Medical-Surgical/Psychosocial Nursing II is a continuation of Medical Surgical/Psychosocial Nursing I taught during the previous term. This course provides the student with various learning experiences in utilizing the nursing process to provide safe, evidenced-based nursing care and to meet the needs of the patients, family, and the community. The topics taught in this course are sensory-motor, renal & urinary, male & female reproductive disorders and patients experiencing psychosocial changes. The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals, the Quality and Safety Education for Nurse Competencies, and the American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice are integrated throughout the course. Students receive concurrent simulation and clinical experiences. Observational experiences are provided in the hospital and in the community settings. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220; MAT 109; BIO 410; NURS 100; NURS 101 Corequisite BIO 216

BIO 216 – Nutrition and Diet Therapy – 3 credits (42 hours)
A rigorous overview of nutrition in health and disease. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220; MAT 109; BIO 410; NURS 100; NURS 101 Co-requisite: Nursing 102

Third Year Courses

NURS 200: Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing – 8 credits – Theory 75 hours; Clinical 135 hours
This course introduces the student to advanced medical-surgical nursing concepts. This occurs through interactions with individual patients and groups of patients in critical care, emergency/trauma, perioperative and outpatient settings. The course incorporates American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice, Quality and Safety Education for Nursing Competencies, and Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220 MAT 109; BIO 410; BIO 216; NURS 100; NURS 101; NURS 102 Corequisite Fall Term PSY 208, Winter Term THE 210

NURS 201: Maternal/Child Health Nursing – 8 credits – Theory 75 hours; Clinical 135 hours
Maternal/Child Health Nursing is concerned with the childbearing family, its needs during health and illness, and progresses through the normal sequence of family development. The theory and clinical experience are concurrent. Clinical practice is delivered in the Hospital Maternity and Pediatric Units incorporating all present standards of care. Additional experiences which are aimed at wellness, health maintenance, and preventive care are provided in a variety of community settings such as: Childbirth Education Classes; Day Care Centers; Special Care Clinics; and School Health Programs. Also included is an experience in a community outreach education program. Course content focuses upon the assessment of needs of the mother, child, and/or family unit during the pregnancy phase of family development--from the planning of pregnancy, through the birth of the child, infancy, early childhood, through adolescence. In addition, the implications of illness patterns and behavior problems of each stage of child development are presented. Included are not only the physiologic and psychologic adjustments to the reproductive cycle, but also the study of human growth and development, presented as theory and concepts with clinical application. The maternal/child health nursing course is a study of the emerging family as well as the developing family. The course objectives and outline are based on The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals, Quality and Safety Education for Nursing Competencies, and American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220; MAT 109; BIO 410; BIO 216; NURS 100; NURS 101; NURS 102 Corequisite Fall Term PSY 208, Winter Term THE 210

PSY 208 – Human Development Across the Life Span – 3 credits (42 hours)
Focuses on physical, cognitive, social, personality and moral development through life span from conception to death. Cross cultural, gender and minority issues are integrated when appropriate. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220 MAT 109; BIO 410; BIO 216; NURS 100; NURS 101; NURS 102 Corequisite Nursing 200 or Nursing 201

THE 210 – Medical Moral Theology – 3 credits (42 hours)
Investigation of moral problems, which can arise in the area of bioethics. Introductory survey of the basic Christian principles of morality is followed by treatment of various medical moral situations. Natural law methodology is applied throughout the course. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220 MAT 109; BIO 410; BIO 216; NURS 100; NURS 101; NURS 102 Corequisite NURS 200 or NURS 201

NURS 300: Transition to Professional Nursing Practice – 9 credits Theory 60 hours; Clinical 225 hours
Transition to Professional Nursing Practice provides the student with learning experiences that simulate the future role of the entry-level professional nurse. The course addresses modalities of nursing care, concepts of leadership and management, nursing theories, research, and legal/ethical aspects of care. Synthesis of previous and concurrent learning occurs as students perform the role of an entry-level professional nurse in complex nursing situations. Goals include development of independence in nursing practice, skill and accountability in clinical decision-making, and application of nursing leadership and management theory and skills. The student is prepared to meet the challenges of licensure examination, role transition, and career management in a complex and dynamic health care system through goal development and career planning. Professional growth and commitment to learning through formal and informal continuing education are stressed. The course incorporates American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice, Quality and Safety Education for Nursing Competencies, and Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals. The course includes class hours for comprehensive standardized testing. Prerequisites: BIO 107, BIO 117; COM 101; PSY 101; BIO 108; BIO 118; COM 103; PHI 105; BIO 220; MUS 220 MAT 109; BIO 410; BIO 216; PSY 208; THE 210; NURS 100; NURS 101; NURS 102; NURS 200; NURS 201