Not only is it normal to have questions about the COVID-19 vaccine, it’s beneficial. You deserve to know about the safety and the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines and how you can schedule an appointment (which are required at our COVID-19 vaccination clinic locations outside the Lehigh Valley). We’ve compiled the most frequently asked questions to provide answers. Para español, haz clic aquí.

9/15/2022 at 5:46 PM

Jump to:

Questions about scheduling and availability at LVHN
Questions about considerations before receiving a vaccine
Questions about safety and effectiveness for children and adults
Questions about how the vaccine works
Questions about how the vaccine will impact the pandemic
Questions about clinical trials
Questions about third COVID-19 vaccine for immunocompromised people
Questions about booster shots

 

 

Questions about scheduling and availability at LVHN

Q: Who is eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccination?

A: Anyone age 6 months or older can receive a COVID-19 vaccination. Anyone under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian to get vaccinated. There is one treatment – corticosteroid injection – that influences when you plan to have your COVID-19 vaccine. Read more

Q: How can I get vaccinated at LVHN?

A: You now have more options than ever to get your vaccine:

  1. Schedule right on this website for people 12 and older.


    Make an appointment

  2. Schedule on MyLVHN, our patient portal, for people 6 months and older.


    Sign In

  3. Call 833-584-6283 (833-LVHN-CVD). The COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline is open Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

The FDA-approved Pfizer vaccine is provided at all LVHN vaccine clinics.

Q: How do I schedule a COVID-19 vaccine for my 6 month-4-year-old child?

A: The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is now available for children 6 months through 4 years. Visit this page for details on specific clinics for this age group in Whitehall and this page for information on clinics for this age group in Pottsville, East Stroudsburg and Hazleton.

Q: How do I schedule a COVID-19 vaccine for my 5-11-year-old child?

A: To schedule a COVID-19 vaccine for your 5-11-year-old child, log in to your child’s MyLVHN account and schedule there, or call the LVHN COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline at 833-584-6283 (833-LVHN-CVD). The COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline is open Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Q. Can I walk into one of your vaccination locations?

A: Appointments are required at LVHN COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics.

Q: What is the Novavax vaccine?

A: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an emergency use authorization (EUA)) for the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine on July 13, 2022. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorsed the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine for people on July 20, 2022, for adults and expanded the recommendation to include adolescents 12-17 years on Aug. 22, 2022.

Novavax is available as a primary two-dose COVID-19 vaccine for people age 12 and older at LVHN’s COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic–MacArthur Road located in Whitehall.

Q: Can Novavax be used as a booster?

A: Novavax is not indicated to be used as a booster shot at this time.

Q: How is Novavax different than other vaccines on the market?

A: Unlike the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, the Novavax vaccine is not an mRNA vaccine and is ideal for those who have an allergy to an mRNA component or wanted a more traditional type of vaccine. Novavax is a more traditional protein-based vaccine that works by getting the body’s immune system to recognize modified pieces of the virus. There is no live virus in the vaccine.

Q: What is the timing for the Novavax vaccines?

A: The primary two-doses of the Novavax vaccine are recommended to be given three weeks apart, however, it’s possible to wait up to eight weeks if necessary.

Q: Where does LVHN offer Novavax?

A: LVHN will offer Novavax as a primary COVID-19 vaccine option at the LVHN COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic–MacArthur Road located in Whitehall.

Q: Do I need an appointment to get the Novavax vaccine?

A: Appointments are required.

    • There are two easy ways to schedule your vaccine:
      • Go to MyLVHN, the health network’s patient portal (parents may need to request proxy access to their child’s account by contacting their provider’s office).
      • Call our COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline at 833-584-6283 (833-LVHN-CVD), Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Q: Who can be vaccinated through the Mobile Vaccination Unit?

LVHN began the COVID-19 mobile vaccination unit in January 2021 as a way to reach large concentrations of people eligible for the vaccine, but unable to get to hospitals or drive-through clinics.

In March 2021, Bennett Toyota donated three new vehicles to LVHN, which are used as part of LVHN’s COVID-19 mobile vaccination unit.

The vehicles are used to transport vaccines, IT infrastructure such as computers and the medical team. The COVID-19 mobile vaccination unit serves all areas of our region and visits senior high-rises, community centers and other facilities to reach community members with limited transportation and other access barriers.

Currently, the mobile units are focused on community-based large-scale vaccine clinics and are not being used for the “house call” model of vaccination.

Q: How can I cancel my vaccine appointment?

A: You can cancel your appointment through MyLVHN or by calling the LVHN COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline 833-584-6283 (833-LVHN-CVD). COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline hours of operation are Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Q: If I need to cancel my appointment, can I give it to a friend?

A: No, you are not able to transfer appointments to others.

Q: If I received my first dose of COVID-19 vaccine outside of the health network, can I get my second dose at LVHN?

A: Yes, LVHN does provide second doses for people who received their first dose elsewhere. We ask that you bring proof of your first dose (such as your vaccine card) to your appointment.

Q: How can people who don’t have access to technology schedule their vaccine appointment?

A: Please call the COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline at 833-584-6283 (833-LVHN-CVD). The COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline hours of operation are Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Q: Can I choose which vaccine I receive at LVHN?

A: The Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are available at all LVHN vaccine clinic locations. Individuals age 18 and older can request which vaccine they wish to receive. However, availability is based on vaccine supply. At this time, LVHN is only offering the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children between the ages of 6 months and 17 years.

While all vaccines are available through LVHN, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is now recommending the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines over the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. This is because they are more effective, and there have been rare (but severe) safety issues related to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. You should only receive the Johnson & Johnson vaccine if you cannot receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine (due to allergy concerns or other medical reasons).

Questions about considerations before receiving a vaccine

Q: Who should not receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

A: There are no preexisting conditions that are contraindications for the COVID-19 vaccine. (Contraindication: A symptom or condition that makes use of a drug, like the vaccine, risky.) If you have questions about a medical condition or allergy, speak with your primary care provider.

There is one situation that requires you to carefully plan when you have your COVID-19 vaccine, booster or third shot:

  • You have received a corticosteroid injection: There is currently no direct evidence to suggest that a corticosteroid injection before or after a COVID-19 vaccine, booster or third shot decreases the vaccine’s effectiveness. However, the Spine Intervention Society recommends that people consider the timing of their corticosteroid injection when scheduling a COVID-19 vaccine, booster or third shot. People should wait two weeks after receiving a corticosteroid injection before receiving a COVID-19 vaccine, booster or third shot. After receiving the vaccine, people should wait one week before receiving a corticosteroid injection.

 

VIDEO: What if I recently received another vaccine or am scheduled to get another type of vaccine?

A. If you recently received a vaccine, there is no reason to delay your COVID-19 vaccination. Likewise, there is no reason to wait to get another vaccination after your COVID-19 vaccination. COVID-19 vaccines and other vaccines can be administered without regard to timing. At this time, LVHN is administering the vaccine to people 6 months and older.

Q: Will people who have gotten sick with COVID-19 still benefit from getting vaccinated?

A: Yes. While people who have tested positive for COVID-19 do produce antibodies, the antibody levels and how long they last are not known. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19, and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, you are advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if you have been sick with COVID-19 previously. At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person, and the evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long in some people.

VIDEO: Why should the young and healthy get vaccinated against COVID-19?

Q: I have a health condition that prevents me from getting vaccines with live viruses. Does the COVID-19 vaccine use a live virus?

A: Both Pfizer-BioNTech’s and Moderna’s vaccines are mRNA vaccines. This means they are made from genetic material that provides your body with the code it needs to create spike proteins (not the virus) and build immunity. AstraZeneca’s and Johnson & Johnson’s are non-replicating virus-vectored vaccines. None of these vaccines are live vaccines.

VIDEO: Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?

A: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as well as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) and American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), all recommend that pregnant or breastfeeding patients be offered the COVID-19 vaccine.

The CDC and these medical societies also recommend the vaccine be offered to patients undergoing fertility treatment based on Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) eligibility criteria. Since the vaccine is not a live virus, there is no reason to delay pregnancy attempts because of vaccination or to defer treatment until the second dose has been administered.

Read a full article about this topic.

VIDEO: Can I take over-the-counter medication before my COVID-19 shot?

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Questions about safety and effectiveness

VIDEO: What is the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) and is it reliable?

VIDEO: Will COVID-19 vaccines be safe if the clinical trials are moving so quickly?

VIDEO: Will I get COVID-19 from the vaccine?

Q: What are the side effects of vaccination?

A: According to the CDC, possible side effects include pain, redness or swelling at the injection site, as well as tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, fever and nausea. These mild side effects are more common after the second dose. Read how LVHN front-line colleagues felt after their first dose and after their second dose of vaccine.

Q: Is the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine safe and effective for children?

A: LVHN is currently offering the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children age 6 months and older. It has been proven safe and effective, and it has also been found to reduce the risk of severe illness and death among children. That is why pediatric specialists at Lehigh Valley Reilly Children’s Hospital are encouraging parents to get their children vaccinated. Anyone under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian to get vaccinated.

Q: Did the Pfizer vaccine receive full FDA approval for children?

A: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday, Aug. 23, gave full approval to the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for those 12 and older, elevating it from emergency use authorization (EUA). It remains under EUA for those children age 6 months to 11 years.

Q: What are the most common vaccine side effects in children?

A: For children age 4 and older, the most common side effects are swelling, redness or pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, chills, fever, muscle pain, swollen lymph nodes and joint pain. For children age 3 and younger, common side effects include pain at the injection site, irritability or crying, swollen lymph nodes, loss of appetite and sleepiness. Younger children may experience fewer side effects than teens and young adults.

Q: What should I do if my child experiences side effects?

A: You may want to give your child acetaminophen four times a day for the first one to two days at the appropriate dosing after receiving the vaccine. Please don’t give your child ibuprofen or acetaminophen before receiving the vaccine. To reduce pain and discomfort where your child got the shot, apply a cool, wet cloth to the spot on the arm where the shot was given. Drinking lots of fluids and wearing light clothing can help when there is fever.

Questions about how the vaccine works

VIDEO: Does a vaccine only protect the person who receives it?

VIDEO: How long will my vaccine provide protection against COVID-19?

Q: How does the vaccine for COVID-19 work?

A: Pfizer-BioNTech’s and Moderna’s vaccines use novel messenger-RNA, or mRNA, technology, which uses modified genetic material to cause the body to create a protein from the virus. The immune system then recognizes the protein as foreign and initiates an immune response.

For the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, researchers took DNA from the coronavirus and put it in a shell called an adenovirus. The adenovirus cannot replicate in your system or make you sick. It acts as a Trojan horse by entering your system like a virus would and then prompting your body to create antibodies.

Q: How is the Johnson & Johnson vaccine different than the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines?

A: There are a few things that make the Johnson & Johnson vaccine different than the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. Researchers took DNA from the coronavirus and put it in a shell called an adenovirus. The adenovirus cannot replicate in your system or make you sick. It acts as a Trojan horse by entering your system like a virus would and then prompting your body to create antibodies. Johnson & Johnson has decades of research on adenovirus vaccines. Other vaccines available that use this technology include the Ebola vaccine (also made by Johnson & Johnson), the HPV vaccine, the hepatitis B vaccine and an influenza vaccine.

Unlike the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, only one dose is required for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Pfizer and Moderna vaccines must be stored in freezers, while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine can be kept in a refrigerator for at least three months.

The CDC is now recommending the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines over the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. This is because they are more effective, and there have been rare (but severe) safety issues related to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. You should only receive the Johnson & Johnson vaccine if you cannot receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine (due to allergy concerns or other medical reasons).

Q: Will the vaccine keep me from getting COVID-19?

A: Current data shows that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at preventing severe disease. During the clinical trials, scientists compared how many people in the vaccinated group and the placebo group went on to develop the disease.

The companies will continue to test people in the studies for antibodies to the COVID-19 virus, which would include people who did not show any symptoms of infection. This allows researchers to get a better sense of whether the vaccines protect against not only getting sick (experiencing symptoms), but also against infection (becoming infected without experiencing symptoms).

Q: Will COVID-19 vaccines cause me to test positive on COVID-19 viral tests?

A: No. These vaccines will not cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection. If your body develops an immune response, which is the goal of vaccination, you should test positive on antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection or vaccination and that you may have some level of protection against the virus.

Q: What is a vaccine?

A: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a vaccine stimulates your immune system to produce antibodies and cellular immunity to combat a specific disease, like it would if you were actually exposed to the disease. After getting vaccinated, you develop immunity to that disease without having to get the disease first. This is why vaccines are necessary — they prevent disease by letting you develop immunity in a safe and controlled way.

Q: How many primary doses of the COVID-19 vaccine will I need?

A: Depending on your age, the type of COVID-19 vaccine you receive (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna or Johnson & Johnson), and if you are immunocompromised, you will either receive one, two or three primary doses.

The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna primary vaccine series involve two doses, while the Johnson & Johnson primary vaccine series is one dose. Some individuals who are immunocompromised will be recommended to receive an additional primary dose.

Q: What if I miss a dose of a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine?

A: These two COVID-19 vaccines are not completely effective unless you receive all your recommended doses.

Q: Do second and third doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines cause more side effects than the first dose?

A: When you receive a COVID-19 vaccine, your immune system goes to work creating antibodies to protect itself from the coronavirus. The vaccine CANNOT cause a COVID-19 infection but can cause mild side effects, including pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, joint pain and fever.

Ultimately, symptoms such as sore arms, muscle aches, fever and headaches mean that your immune system is responding to the vaccine and producing antibodies that will protect against future infection with coronavirus. Read how some of LVHN front-line colleagues felt after their second vaccination.

Q: How can I know the difference between vaccine side effects and COVID-19 symptoms?

If you experience cough, sore throat, shortness of breath, or loss of taste or smell, stay home. Those symptoms are not known to be side effects associated with the vaccine. It may be difficult to distinguish between some side effects of the vaccine and symptoms of COVID-19 or other illnesses. When in doubt, speak to a provider virtually. You can view virtual care options at LVHN.org/VirtualCare.

VIDEO: Will getting the flu vaccine protect me from COVID-19?

A: A flu vaccine will not protect you from getting COVID-19, but it can help to prevent you from getting influenza (flu) at the same time as COVID-19. This can help keep you from having a more severe illness. You should encourage all of your friends and family to get flu shots.

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Questions about how the vaccine will impact the pandemic

Q: Do I have to continue wearing a mask after I get the vaccine?

A: Depending on the circumstances and local ordinances, you may need to continue wearing a face mask even after you are vaccinated.

Some places you must wear a face mask include:

  • Lehigh Valley Health Network hospitals
  • Lehigh Valley Physician Group practices
  • All LVHN rehabilitation centers
  • All LVHN locations that provide health care

Schools, businesses, churches and other organizations are making decisions about the necessity for people to wear face masks based on what is known at that time about community spread of the coronavirus.

Even if you are vaccinated, practicing excellent hand hygiene, social distancing and wearing a face mask in a crowded area all can help reduce levels of spread.

Though the COVID-19 vaccines are very effective, some people have still become infected with COVID-19 and transmitted the virus.

Q: Do vaccines mean the pandemic is over?

 

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Questions about clinical trials

Q: What does Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) mean?

A: In an emergency, like a pandemic, the FDA can make a judgment that it is worth releasing something for use even without following the typical timeline for a new vaccine or drug. The administrative portions of the trial have been sped up. The scientific analysis of clinical trial participants remains the same for these and all other vaccines. If there’s evidence that strongly suggests that patients have benefited from the vaccine in clinical trials and that it is safe, the agency can issue an EUA to make it available. The FDA has issued EUAs many times previously in other situations. The EUA process is well established and is not newly created to address COVID-19 vaccine development. Two COVID-19 vaccines have received FDA approval following EUA: Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine received FDA approval Aug. 23, 2021, and Moderna vaccine received FDA approval on Jan. 31, 2022. Johnson & Johnson vaccine has emergency use authorization.

Q: Are there non-mRNA vaccines available?

A: The Johnson & Johnson vaccine does not use mRNA. Researchers took DNA from the coronavirus and put it in a shell called an adenovirus. The adenovirus cannot replicate in your system or make you sick. It acts as a Trojan horse by entering your system like a virus would and then prompting your body to create antibodies. Johnson & Johnson has decades of research on adenovirus vaccines. Other vaccines available that use this technology include the Ebola vaccine (also made by Johnson & Johnson), the HPV vaccine, the hepatitis B vaccine and an influenza vaccine.

However, the CDC is now recommending the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines over the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. This is because they are more effective, and there have been rare (but severe) safety issues related to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. You should only receive the Johnson & Johnson vaccine if you cannot receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine (due to allergy concerns or other medical reasons).

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Questions about variants

VIDEO: What are COVID-19 variants and how can we prevent them?

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Questions about third COVID-19 vaccine for immunocompromised people

Q: How do I schedule a third primary dose COVID-19 vaccination?

A: Registration is required and can be done through MyLVHN or telephone:

  • MyLVHN, our patient portal – MyLVHN app and MyLVHN.org
    • Click the “Menu” button.
    • Select “Schedule COVID-19 Vaccine - 3rd Shot (for immunocompromised).”
    • Follow the prompts and choose the location and time that work best for you.
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline – 833-584-6283 (833-LVHN-CVD). The hotline is open Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

Q: Why might I need to receive a third shot of the COVID-19 vaccine?

A: According to the CDC, emerging data suggest some people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems do not always build the same level of immunity after vaccination against COVID-19, compared to people who are not immunocompromised.

Q: Are 12-17-year-olds who are immunocompromised eligible for the third dose of COVID-19 vaccine?

A: Individuals age 12-17 who are immunocompromised can receive a third primary shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine 28 days after their second shot. That type is the only COVID-19 vaccine that has FDA Emergency Use Authorization for that age group.

Q. When can children age 5-11 who are immunocompromised get their third shot? 

 A.  Children age 5-11 who are immunocompromised can receive a third shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine 28 days after their second shot. That type is the only COVID-19 vaccine that has FDA Emergency Use Authorization for that age group.

Q: What conditions may mean I am immunocompromised?

A: The CDC recommends a third vaccine shot for those with a range of conditions, such as recipients of organ or stem cell transplants, people with advanced or untreated HIV infection, active recipients of treatment for cancer, people who are taking some medications that weaken the immune system, and others.

Individuals with any of the following conditions, or those directed to receive a third dose by their physician:

  • Patients receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Organ transplant recipients who are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Those who received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Patients with moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Those with advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Patients undergoing active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress immune response

A full list of conditions is available on the CDC website, Opens in new tabcdc.gov.
For additional information and more FAQs on this topic, visit LVHN.org/thirdshot

Q: Where will COVID-19 third shots be given?

A: COVID-19 vaccinations (first dose, second dose third dose and booster shots) will be offered at all LVHN COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics. Learn more those locations at LVHN.org/vaccines.

Q: How long do I have to wait until after my last Pfizer or Moderna shot to get a third dose of the vaccine?

A: The FDA recommends immunocompromised patients wait at least 28 days from the second shot of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine before receiving a third dose of either vaccine. It is recommended the third dose be from the same manufacturer as the previous doses, when feasible.

Q: What side effects might I have if I receive a third dose?

A: Studies on a third COVID-19 shot show it is safe and that mild or moderate reaction symptoms were consistent with earlier doses. No patients developed critical side effects that required hospitalization.

Q: I received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine and also am immunocompromised. Can I get a second shot of the J&J vaccine?

A: The FDA did not provide guidance for those who are immunocompromised and received the single shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Currently there is not enough data to support additional vaccination. Those individuals should consult their physician.

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Questions about booster shots

VIDEO: Why should I get a COVID-19 booster shot?

Q: Who is eligible for COVID-19 booster shots?

A: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends booster shots for all adults 18 and older, and the Pfizer-BioNTech booster for children and teens 5-17. Timing for boosters is:

  • Adults 18 years and older: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson and Johnson (J&J) booster shots are available. Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna boosters can be given two months after the initial two-dose series is completed.

    Children and teens 5-17 years: Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shots are available for children 5-17 years of age. For 5-11 year olds, they can receive a booster five months after the initial two-dose series is completed. For ages 12 and up, the waiting period is two months.

  • Johnson & Johnson booster: Two months after receiving their Johnson & Johnson vaccine although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the mRNA vaccine boosters (Pfizer and Moderna) over the Johnson & Johnson vaccine booster because the mRNA vaccines have been proven more effective and there have been rare (but severe) safety issues related to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine

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Q: Which booster shot should I get?

A: The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) now recommends the mRNA vaccine boosters (Pfizer and Moderna) over the Johnson & Johnson vaccine booster, regardless of which vaccine series you received previously.

This is because the mRNA vaccines have been proven more effective, and there have been rare (but severe) safety issues related to the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

If you received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine series initially, you can choose to receive either Pfizer or Moderna for your subsequent booster(s) – the booster does not have to be the same brand as your initial vaccine series. 

If you received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine initially, you should receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine as your booster. 

If you are unable to receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine (due to allergies or other medical concerns), the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is still available and recommended over not getting a booster shot.

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Q: How do I schedule a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot?

A: Scheduling is required and can be done through:

  • MyLVHN, our patient portal – MyLVHN app and MyLVHN.org
    • Log in to your MyLVHN account
    • Select the "Menu" button
    • Choose “Schedule COVID-19 Vaccine – Booster Shot”
    • Follow the prompts and choose the location and time that work best for you.
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Hotline – 833-584-6283 (833-LVHN-CVD). The hotline is open Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

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Q: Where will COVID-19 booster shots be given?

A: COVID-19 vaccinations will continue to be offered at all LVHN COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics. Please note: Your first two shots may have occurred in an LVHN location that no longer offers COVID-19 vaccinations. Learn more about the locations that do offer COVID-19 vaccines.

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Q: Who is eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine booster?

A: All individuals 5 years and older are eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine booster.

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Q: What are the underlying medical conditions that may put a person more at risk for COVID-19 infection or severe illness?

A: Medical conditions include:

  • Cancer
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • COPD
  • Down syndrome
  • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant or from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, or use of other immune weakening medicines
  • Obesity (body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher but less than 40 kg/m2)
  • Severe obesity (BMI equal to or greater than 40 kg/m2)
  • Pregnancy
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Smoking
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

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Q: What side effects might I have if I receive a booster dose?

A: You may experience mild or moderate reaction symptoms very similar to the side effects experienced after your initial COVID-19 vaccination(s). 

Side effects may include:

  • Pain, redness and swelling at the injection site 
  • Fatigue 
  • Headache 
  • Muscle or joint pain  
  • Chills 
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the underarm  

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Q: Is there a cost for a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot?

A: A COVID-19 vaccine booster shot is free.

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